Monday, July 27, 2009

Harmony With Nature




Since the beginning of creation we have relied on Nature to yield her gifts of fibers to weave into cloth.


From biblical times or of primitive peoples the process is exactly the same. With the exception of the handling of clay on the potter's wheel little has changed over the centuries.

'The growing of flax and the long stages it took to become thread,
Nature entered intimately into textiles from the past.' *


Wool harvested from sheep, fibres from alpacas, even goats and camels yielded forth the necessities... to live in direct cooperation with nature.

Barks, berries and flowers provided the palette for colour. With the discovery of Indigo, blue and white made their way into early cloth and garments.


Perhaps it is this connection that stirs our passion for collecting and caretaking of textiles from the past...

* Homespun Blue by Martha Sterns 1940.
Homespun wool blankets from my personal collection

12 comments:

Pamela Terry and Edward said...

This certainly rings my bell. Since taking up knitting last fall, I am completely besotted with threads and yarns! Of course, I've always been a fabric junkie!

Lori said...

what a wonderful post...i love the first picture...it is lovely!!!

Vicki's Bit-o-earth said...

What an in exquisite post, Not only the photos, but the words. It all peaked my interested completely. Thank you~

My mother is of American Indian decent and has raised my sibling and me to love learning some of the lost arts of spinning and weaving! She has several types of looms (simple ones) and a spinning wheel. I learned as a child how to use a drop spinner... long story short... my interest has settled on gardening, so the last part of your post grabbed my attention. I bought seed to grow Indigo last summer. It grew very well here (and in fact self-seeded itself this year)and I was so excited! Mom and I tried to work through the process of turning it to dye... but alas, its a very precise and long process which we sort of failed at for the time being... but she and I will keep trying!

Miss Maddie, this was a wonderful post, and though my Mom doesn't use computers, I will show this post to her. She will enjoy it as much as I did! Thank you~ Vicki

The Victorian Parlor said...

The pictures are lovely! I too love the feel and texture of different fabrics. I quilted for years and my love of textiles has never waned.

Blessings,

Kim

Doreen said...

Oh SO beautiful. I have ALWAYS had a love for fabrics...I swear it's what draws me to create...:)

LOVE the sheep photo..gosh that's lovely.

Hugs,xox
Doreen

Karen from A`Musements said...

Beautiful post, Susan.... and since it was 102* where I live today, you KNOW you must have had something truly inspired to say, to make me interested in WOOL! As always, thought provoking and beautiful photos.... Now, can you send me a fan?!
xoxo
Karen

Pondside said...

Beautiful blankets - think of how many beds they've graced, and still so soft-looking.

miss gracies house said...

Textiles are becoming my new favorite...the more owrn the better. Lovely post and such sweet comments you left for me!
Rene'

Pondside said...

Hi again - you asked about the bridge.......it crosses the mouth of the Columbia River, between Astoria, Oregon and Washington State's Olympic Peninsula. It's truly a beauty.

Thistlebrooms said...

What exquisite photo's of the sheep...
I know for myself that the 'connection does stir my passion' of early textiles...
Beautifully said...

My Best...Marilyn

Queen Of The Armchair aka Dzintra Stitcheries said...

Susan...mmm, the texture of that woolen blanket makes me want to reach in and put it around my shoulders...perfect for this time of year for us...
And doesn't Nature yield such wonderful gifts for us...a very thought provoking post...loved it!!! Take Care...Dzintra♥x

Julie said...

Hi Susan,
Beautiful!!! Wools and homespuns are my first love. I love your wool blankets!!
Thank you for sharing,
Julie