Monday, January 10, 2011

History on the Move


In the region where I dwell there are hamlets and villages that pervade the landscape...
Rich in history they are in an endless struggle to remain constant...


This past week the former historic Queenston chapel was moved from its present location to stand on its original site next to the Laura Secord Homestead.


Built in 1862 as a Methodist meetinghouse, it has stood the test of time and shall be restored to its former glory... so once again the echoes of my ancestors can rejoice in song...

* Monument of General Sir Isaac Brock at Queenston Heights.

17 comments:

Half-heard in the Stillness said...

I think it's amazing when I see that the experts have moved a whole building onto wheels as they do where you live. It's fantastic! To move a building over here in England they have to literally take it down brick by brick and then put it back together once again..it takes months!
How marvelous that this lovely old building will be back in it's rightful home.
What a brilliant photograph of the tall tall column in the snow, who is that on the top? It reminded me of Nelson's column in London.

Jane

snoopydog said...

Beautiful pics as always. Such a worthwhile journey. History is just so important. Hope you're keeping warm. Ros and Oscar

Larkrise garden girl said...

How very interesting,Thank you for the wonderful pictures. The snow looks cold,,,, Cheri

Pondside said...

I've seen the Brock monument, but never the Secord house or this chapel. I'll have something to search out the next time I'm at the Shaw.

Catherine said...

Sometimes the smallest little towns have the most interesting things!

Great photos!
xo Catherine

Constance said...

I'm always so thrilled when I see a lovely old building being restored. I wish this area was more interested in preserving our history and beautiful old homes, churches and our down town area. It is wonderful that the meeting hall has now reeturned to it's original site. Thank you for sharing.
Blessings,
Sallie

Leigh said...

Hello. I appreciated your comment on my blog about my Charlie, and wanted to return the blog visit. I love places with history to them. Always so interesting. Lovely photos.

InesMrs.Venus said...

Unbelievable!!! When I visited America, I´ve seen a house moving on the highway. Fantastic :-)))
And it´s really great, that this old house is able to move. As I said- unbelievable for me ...

Enjoy your day- hugs, Ines

Theresa said...

Oh watching buildings being moved is fascinating. imagine the planning that must have to go into it. Power lines, traffic lights and corners wide enough along the route.
I bet it will be a wonderful place once brought back to it's former glory.

Cottage Garden said...

Fascinating to see a whole building being moved to a different location Susan. Its heartening to know that the chapel will once again stand where it is meant to be. A lovely story, and photos of a very wintry looking Canada. Stay warm and cosy!

Jeanne
x

Julia said...

I love to see history preserved. That's how I like seeing our tax dollars work.

Penelope's Beehive said...

What a lovely chapel...the simple design of the building, the beautiful curves of the windows. I can just imagine the Methodist Hymns being sung so very long ago. Thank you for sharing a bit of history Susan.

Blessings to you...Judy ox

June said...

How wonderful that this old meetinghouse gets to go home. It looks like it will make the move just fine. I love the picture of the monument! Your frozen post was full of gorgeous pictures.
sending you hugs from here...

Queen Of The Armchair aka Dzintra Stitcheries said...

Oh Susan...how wonderful, I love stories like this...and those words 'echoes of my ancestors' just gives me a warm fuzzy feeling!!! I hope you will be able to show us more of this restoration...Dzintra♥x

Toni aka irishlas said...

Going back to whence it came.
Such a good thing.

Zuzu said...

This is wonderful, Susan! I am so happy to see restoration in 2011!!!
Wishing you a lovely new week,
Zuzu

Julie said...

Hi Susan,
I love old buidings and it is so nice when we can see them being saved.
Happy New Years,
Julie